Cooking with Jonathan By Jonathan Jolicoeur

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In this weekly culinary column, I will be focusing on one dish – giving the reader a quick history of the dish, the classical preparation of it, and of course, my own spin on the classic.

This week I have chosen to cover mousse – which originated in France. Mousse translates from French to English as “foam” and gets its name from the preparation style – which includes air into the mouse to give it an airy texture. Mousses range from being light and airy to thick and creamy. Typically, mousses are made by incorporating whipped egg whites or whipped cream. The most common flavors added to mousses are chocolate and pureed fruits.

Classic Chocolate Mousse

4 oz​Semisweet chocolate
2 tbsp​Unsalted butter, room temp
2​Eggs, separated
1/3 cup​Sugar
1/3 cup​Heavy cream
¼ tsp​Vanilla extract

Place the chocolate and butter into a double boiler over medium heat. Whisk until smooth and remove from heat. Cool slightly. Add egg yolks to the chocolate 1 at a time until fully incorporated. In a separate bowl, beat the egg whites until foamy. Gradually add your sugar to the bowl while whisking, until you form stiff peaks. In a separate chilled bowl, beat the cream until it forms soft peaks. With a rubber spatula, fold the egg whites into the chocolate, then fold in the whipped cream. Make sure to fully incorporate the mousse, but take care not to over-work it.

Jonathan’s Chocolate Mousse

2 oz​Semisweet chocolate
2 oz​Dark chocolate
2 tbsp​Unsalted butter, room temp
2 oz​Kahlua
2​Eggs, separated
1/3 cup​Sugar
1/3 cup​Heavy cream
1​Vanilla bean, split, deseeded

In a small pot over low heat, place your vanilla bean, cream and Kahlua. Heat until hot to the touch and then remove from the heat. Place into a container, then into your fridge to cool. Once the cream has cooled, place chocolate and butter into a double boiler over medium heat. Whisk until smooth and remove from heat. Cool slightly. Add egg yolks to the chocolate 1 at a time until fully incorporated. In a separate bowl, beat the egg whites until foamy. Gradually add your sugar to the bowl while whisking, until you form stiff peaks. In a separate chilled bowl, strain your cream mixture and whip until it forms soft peaks. With a rubber spatula, fold the egg whites into the chocolate, then fold in the whipped cream. Make sure to fully incorporate the mousse, but take care not to over-work it.

Whether you choose to prepare the classic, my twist or your own interpretation, remember that food is about bringing people together and that the act of cooking is about caring and as long as your heart is in the dish you prepare, the people you are cooking for will appreciate it (and you).

If you have any questions for me or would like to see me cover any particular dish in this column, feel free to write me, care of this publication. From my kitchen to yours, it is my pleasure to give you a peek into the mind of a chef. Thank You

Jonathan Jolicoeur is a chef at A Tavola – an Italian restaurant on Church Street in Winchester – which focuses on “farm to table” style of cooking. Jonathan was born in Somerville, lives in Woburn and has a degree from Le Cordon Bleu College of Culinary Arts.

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