Cooking with Jonathan By Jonathan Jolicoeur

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In this weekly culinary column, I will be focusing on one dish – giving the reader a quick history of the dish, the classical preparation of it, and of course, my own spin on the classic

This week I have chosen to cover consomme – a soup that originated in France some time during the middle ages and is known for its clear broth. Consommes are made by adding ground meat, mirepoix, tomato and egg whites. The key to a good consomme is the simmering to allow a “raft” to form and flavor to concentrate.

Traditional consomme recipe

2 qt​Chicken stock
1​Carrot, chopped
1​Onion, chopped
1​Leek, chopped
2 stocks​Celery, chopped
12 oz​Ground chicken
3​Egg whites
3 tbsp​Water

In a food processor, place the vegetables and pulse until finely chopped. Add ground chicken, water and egg whites. Pulse until fully combined. Combine the stock and ground mixture in a large pot and stir until incorporated. Bring stock to a boil while stirring. Once boil is reached, reduce heat to a low simmer for roughly 45 minutes to an hour. During this time a raft will form. Once cook time has been achieved, remove from heat and let stand for 5 minutes. Using a slotted spoon, crack the raft and carefully remove pieces from the soup. Pour remaining soup through a sieve lined with cheese cloth. Season to taste and serve.

Jonathan’s consomme recipe

2 qt​Veal stock
1​Carrot, chopped
1​Leek, chopped
2 stocks​Celery, chopped
1​Tomato, seeded, chopped
10 oz​Ground veal
3​Egg whites
3 tbsp​Water
1​Bouquet garni (12 peppercorns, 2 sprigs thyme, 2 sprigs rosemary, 1 bay leaf)
to taste​Sea salt

In a food processor, place the vegetables and pulse until finely chopped. Add ground veal, water and egg whites. Pulse until fully combined. Combine the stock, ground mixture and bouquet garni in a large pot and stir until incorporated. Bring stock to a simmer while stirring. Once simmer is reached, reduce heat to a low simmer – allow to simmer on low for roughly 45 minutes to an hour. During this time a raft will form. Once cook time has been achieved, remove from heat and let stand for 5 minutes. Using a slotted spoon, crack the raft and carefully remove pieces from the soup. Pour remaining soup through a sieve lined with multiple layers of cheese cloth. Season to taste with sea salt and garnish with brunoise of vegetables and seared, diced meat.

Whether you choose to prepare the classic, my twist or your own interpretation, remember that food is about bringing people together and that the act of cooking is about caring and as long as your heart is in the dish you prepare, the people you are cooking for will appreciate it (and you).

If you have any questions for me or would like to see me cover any particular dish in this column, feel free to write me, care of this publication. From my kitchen to yours, it is my pleasure to give you a peek into the mind of a chef. Thank You

Jonathan Jolicoeur is a chef at A Tavola – an Italian restaurant on Church Street in Winchester – which focuses on “farm to table” style of cooking. Jonathan was born in Somerville, lives in Woburn and has a degree from Le Cordon Bleu College of Culinary Arts.

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